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The latest in global sexual and reproductive health news

What do Mobile Money and mHealth Offer Each Other?

This blog examines what mobile money and mHealth initiatives can offer each other, citing Pathfinder International's work with mobile payments to community health workers in Tanzania as an example.

Mobile money may also help enable project scale up. Pathfinder transferred $1.8 million to community health workers by mobile payments over 18 months, making it one of the top mobile payment customers in Tanzania. Mobile payments enabled Pathfinder to scale up to 200 trainings within three months, which helped them better perform their project goals.

House and Senate Committees Approve Drastically Different Funding Bills for Global Health Programs

Last week, the House and Senate Appropriations Committees approved vastly different bills to fund U.S. foreign assistance programs, including global health programs for international family planning, maternal and child health, and HIV and AIDS.

Purnima Mane Discusses Sexual and Reproductive Health on To the Contrary

In late May, Pathfinder joined thousands of advocates of women and girls from around the world at Women Deliver. The conference is the topic of this documentary from the PBS's To the Contrary, which features an interview with Purnima Mane.

Melinda Gates, Barbara Bush, Mandy Moore, and other global health leaders on efforts to save the lives of women and girls by increasing access to maternal and child healthcare. Executive producer Cari Stein reports in this special documentary from Malaysia and the Women Deliver Conference.

Challenging Population Growth: Family Planning Services Gloss Over Women’s Health Needs

Pathfinder International's Pakistan Country Representative Tauseef Ahmed discusses the state of family planning in Pakistan with the Express Tribune.

Tauseef said that during the last decade Pakistan’s family planning program was never given due priority in terms of perspective plan implementation. He emphasized that Pakistan needed ‘political will’ to re-design family planning services to reach out all needy women.  “We should have a clear and comprehensive policy to be managed by a commission with full authority,” he said.

UNFPA Explores Collaborative Partnership with Pathfinder International in the Area of Youth Programming

Senior management from UNFPA and Pathfinder International recently held high level talks on how similar programs implemented by the two organizations can be jointly enhanced to increase impact on Kenyans.

Under the maternal and newborn health program, Pathfinder is focused on improving Kenya's health status by supporting government health entities and communities to integrate and strengthen HIV, family planning and maternal and child health services.

Rapid Population Growth Constitutes Threat for Economy

Tauseef Ahmed, Pathfinder's Country Representative in Pakistan, writes about the need for political will to support and advance family planning initiatives in Pakistan.

Pakistan has a very high maternal mortality ratio implying more than 15,000 mother lose their lives in the process of giving birth. It is state’s responsibility to protect the lives of mothers. If Pakistani mothers are to live a health life then provision of family planning becomes their right—right to access and to choose and right to use.

Pathfinder International Selected as Visa Innovation Grant Recipient

Pathfinder is proud to announce it is one of five recipients of a Visa Innovation Grant. Visa Inc. in partnership with NetHope announced grants that are helping modernize the disbursement of funds in the fields of agriculture, health and emergency relief.

The Dukuza Clinic: Providing Care for Young Mothers in South Africa

Paige Claassen shares photos and stories from her visit to Dukuza, a youth-friendly, Pathfinder-supported clinic that serves young mothers in South Africa.

Here, a staff of only three nurses deliver babies, provide AIDS testing and counseling, educate patients about family planning, and care for TB, diabetic, epileptic, and trauma patients, among a long list of other tasks. Dukuza serves between 100 and 200 patients each day, and with the current AIDS epidemic, pressure on the clinic to serve more patients grows.

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