New Public-Private Partnership Will Make Long-Acting Contraceptive Method More Affordable for Millions

Thanks to a new initiative led by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Bayer HealthCare AG, and several other global health leaders, 27 million women will soon have greater access to a long-acting and reversible contraceptive method called Jadelle. The partnership, led by several leaders who attended the London Summit on Family Planning, takes the reproductive health community one step closer to the commitment made at the summit—to provide 120 million women with access to contraceptives by 2020.

"This is a commendable development in our effort toward making reproductive health services affordable and accessible to all."Family planning programs that already exist, included those supported by USAID, will be the first to provide Jadelle at a significant price reduction in more than 50 of the world's poorest countries, including those deemed least likely to meet their Millennium Development Goals on maternal and child health by 2015.

Pathfinder International applauds this new partnership and highly anticipates its positive impact on reproductive health care efforts worldwide.

"More than 222 million women worldwide lack access to the contraceptives they need to plan a healthy future for themselves and their families. This is a commendable development in our effort toward making reproductive health services affordable and accessible to all," said Pathfinder President and CEO Purnima Mane. "I am confident that this step will encourage others to come forward with bold and concrete steps to fulfill their commitments made at the London Summit."

Media Contact

Please contact Kate Stookey, Director of Public Affairs, at 617-972-1231 or kstookey@pathfinder.org

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