Access to Primary Health Care Project

Access to Primary Healthcare Project

As part of a consortium led by IMA World Health, Pathfinder is working to improve family planning, maternal health, and newborn care in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The project, known locally as Projet d’Accès aux Soins de Santé Primaire, improves primary health care in 56 health zones in five provinces. Activities include improving access and quality of health services as well as generating demand for those services. Pathfinder also works to ensure the sustainability of health service delivery after the project is complete.

This five-year project is funded by the Department for International Development of the United Kingdom.

Since the project began in 2012, there have been more than 200,000 new acceptors of family planning. More than 175,000 women are now accessing antenatal care, and the project has reported 200,634 deliveries attended by a skilled health provider.

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