Female Condom and LGBT Support

Photo by Julia Monaghan

A community volunteer uses her training to show a group of women, attending a user support group, how to properly use a female condom.

Photo by Julia Monaghan

With a female condom, a woman can have control; she can insert it several hours before intercourse.

With funding from the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and in partnership with Population Services International, this project aimed to reduce the incidence of HIV infection and the number of unplanned pregnancies among the sexually active population. This was achieved through support for uptake of the female condom—a method that is controlled by women—by educating and empowering women and training them on correct usage and to negotiate contraception with their partners. The project also sought to empower sexual minorities in Mozambique through advocacy and health promotion activities. In order to support these outcomes, Pathfinder helped to ensure access to female condoms in health facilities, supported the training of providers to counsel and provide services related to female condoms, and facilitated the creation of support groups among users of female condoms to ensure correct usage and increase method adherence.

Since January 2012, more than 26,000 female condoms were distributed to health units and 4,800 women participated in meetings to monitor the consistent use of the female condom in health units.

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Women Who Dare: Fostering Gender Equality and Addressing Violence Against Women

This Spring 2013 edition of Pathways explores Pathfinder's gender equality work through the stories of women like Deolinda, a young advocate and female condom user, and Celia, a nurse and family planning advocate empowering women in Matola, Mozambique.

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