Mozambique

Photo by Sarah Day

In 1997, Pathfinder began our work in Mozambique. Today, we are implementing 14 projects. They are diverse, yet share a common goal: to improve and uphold the sexual and reproductive health and rights of Mozambicans.

Photo by Pathfinder Mozambique

Through one project, we are working to prevent gender-based violence. Through another, integrating contraception into primary health services.

Photo by Benjamin Kahrl

A key component of our HIV and AIDS work in Mozambique is to support key populations—like female sex workers and men who have sex with men—those at higher risk for HIV infection, who also experience the most stigma in seeking services.

Photo by Elizabeth Oliveras

Across every project, we strive to build the capacity of local communities, NGOs, and government agencies. Our goal is to scale up approaches that work and leave sustainable, government-owned health programs.

Photo by Sarah Day

The central theme that we uphold through all of our programming in Mozambique is the right to health—providing women with information and access that empowers them to make positive decisions related to their sexual and reproductive health.

Pathfinder International is currently implementing a diverse portfolio of projects in Mozambique using an approach to sexual and reproductive health that is centered on the strengthening and integration of community and health systems.

Pathfinder International has been working in Mozambique since 1997. Today, fifteen years after our first office opened in Maputo and twenty years after the end of the post-independence civil war, the country has made great strides related to the health and development of its people.

34 percent of the population in Mozambique is between the ages of 10-24, and HIV prevalence amongst this group is 7.9 percent

However, use of contraceptives, HIV prevalence, and maternal mortality due to unsafe abortion remain persistent problems for the country; prevalence of modern contraceptive use among married women  remains at only 12 percent, 13.1 percent of women and 9.2 percent of men between the ages of 15-29 test positive for HIV, and in the southern African region an estimated 18 percent of maternal deaths are attributable to complications from unsafe abortion.

Our work ranges from prevention of gender-based violence, with support from UN Women and PEPFAR, to reproductive health, family planning and maternal health at the community and facility levels, encompassing areas such as HIV and malaria with funding from USAID.

And finally, a key component of Pathfinder Mozambique's work in HIV and AIDS includes support for key populations, including men who have sex with men and female sex workers—as these groups are not only at higher risk for HIV infection, but also experience the most stigma in seeking services. All Pathfinder projects are developed with the goal of scale-up and government ownership.

DONATE NOW TO SUPPORT OUR WORK IN PLACES LIKE Mozambique

Your gift of $25 or $50 can help our work in Mozambique to prevent gender-based violence and improve access to contraception for vulnerable groups.

Our Projects

Group of woman at a SCIP gathering

Strengthening Communities through Integrated Programming (SCIP)

Systems Strengthening Adolescent and Youth Sexual and Reproductive Health Gender Behavior Change Maternal & Newborn Health Advocacy HIV & AIDS Contraception & Family Planning

SCIP is designed to increase quality of life at the household and community levels by improving health and nutritional status and advancing household economic viability.

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mCenas! SMS Client Education to Improve Family Planning Uptake Among Youth

Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Adolescent and Youth Sexual and Reproductive Health Behavior Change Contraception & Family Planning

Pathfinder’s mHealth project in Mozambique identified and addressed the educational barriers that youth face in accessing and using family planning.

Related Publications

ESD-FPI Endline
February 2015

Extending Service Delivery-Family Planning Initiative: Endline Survey Results

This project in Mozambique worked with health facilities, pre-service institutes, communities and partners to integrate family planning into primary care services, minimizing the cost of care and maximizing the opportunities to reach men and women with family planning services. The endline survey show the results of the four year project.

Multisectoral Responses to GBV in Mozambique
January 2015

Multisectoral Responses to Gender-based Violence in Mozambique

The complex constellation of factors that underlie and reinforce gender-based violence warrants a strong multi-level and multisectoral response.

December 2014

Change Starts Here: Pathfinder International 2014 Annual Report

We believe change starts with expertly trained providers and pharmacies that never run out of supplies. It starts with open conversations among women, young people, men, religious leaders, mothers-in-law, policymakers, and others, joining to discuss their beliefs and remove barriers to their health and well-being. Our 2014 Annual Report shows a few highlights of how Pathfinder has served as a catalyst for change over the past year.

July 2014

mCenas! Reaching Youth with Information and Stories about Sexual Health

mCenas! - a comprehensive text message-based program that targeted youth aged 15-24 - has increased knowledge about contraceptive methods and dispel common myths around contraceptive methods.

Related News

The Key to Youth-Friendly Sexual and Reproductive Health Services

While a complex set of factors contribute to sexual and reproductive health problems among adolescents, these problems are exacerbated by the lack of youth-friendly health services and accurate information on safe sex and contraceptive use, says the International Women's Health Coalition.

One well-documented initiative is Mozambique’s “Geracao Biz” (“Busy Generation”) program, which included refurbishing adolescent-only clinics, developing training materials for workers, and recruiting peer activists to welcome and educate clients in the waiting room.

Mozambique legalises abortion to stem maternal deaths

President Armando Guebuza on Thursday quietly signed into law a revised penal code bill that eases prohibitions in abortion regulations, a move hailed by health groups.

The move is a victory for women, because it's not so "restrictive" anymore, said Ivone Zilhao a Maputo-based sexual and reproductive health doctor with Pathfinder

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